skip to content

The Godwin Laboratory for Palaeoclimate Research

 
Subscribe to Quaternary Discussion Group: Upcoming Talks feed
A series of 50 minute lectures, followed by discussion, on the broad topic of environmental evolution, climate, ecological and human change during the Quaternary (the last ~2.6 million years). The lectures are aimed at a broad audience (including geoscientists, glaciologists, environmental scientists, atmospheric chemists, biologists, anthropologists and archaeologists). Seminars are usually on Wednesdays in the Department of Geography Small Lecture Theatre (Downing Site), starting at 17:30. Refreshments are served after the talks and there is time for discussion over drinks and/or dinner. QDG is currently organised by Aidan Starr and Svetlana Radionovskaya, supported by David Hodell, Christine Lane, Francesco Muschitiello and Eric Wolff. Please feel free to contact us with queries and suggestions. To sign up to the QDG mailing list, follow this link: https://lists.cam.ac.uk/sympa/subscribe/soc-qdg-quaternary-disc-reminder
Updated: 59 min 38 sec ago

Wed 05 Jun 17:30: (CANCELLED) Extreme glacial implies discontinuity of early human occupation of Europe Building doors are card operated, so latecomers may not be able to access the venue.

Mon, 03/06/2024 - 16:26
(CANCELLED) Extreme glacial implies discontinuity of early human occupation of Europe

The oldest known hominin remains in Europe [ca. 1.5 to 1.1 million years ago (Ma)] have been recovered from Iberia, where paleoenvironmental reconstructions have indicated warm and wet interglacials and mild glacials, supporting the view that once established, hominin populations persisted continuously. We report analyses of marine and terrestrial proxies from a deep-sea core on the Portugese margin that show the presence of pronounced millennial-scale climate variability during a glacial period ca. 1.154 to 1.123 Ma, culminating in a terminal stadial cooling comparable to the most extreme events of the last 400,000 years. Climate envelope–model simulations reveal a drastic decrease in early hominin habitat suitability around the Mediterranean during the terminal stadial. We suggest that these extreme conditions led to the depopulation of Europe, perhaps lasting for several successive glacial-interglacial cycles.

Building doors are card operated, so latecomers may not be able to access the venue.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Wed 05 Jun 17:30: Extreme glacial implies discontinuity of early human occupation of Europe Building doors are card operated, so latecomers may not be able to access the venue.

Wed, 01/05/2024 - 21:50
Extreme glacial implies discontinuity of early human occupation of Europe

The oldest known hominin remains in Europe [ca. 1.5 to 1.1 million years ago (Ma)] have been recovered from Iberia, where paleoenvironmental reconstructions have indicated warm and wet interglacials and mild glacials, supporting the view that once established, hominin populations persisted continuously. We report analyses of marine and terrestrial proxies from a deep-sea core on the Portugese margin that show the presence of pronounced millennial-scale climate variability during a glacial period ca. 1.154 to 1.123 Ma, culminating in a terminal stadial cooling comparable to the most extreme events of the last 400,000 years. Climate envelope–model simulations reveal a drastic decrease in early hominin habitat suitability around the Mediterranean during the terminal stadial. We suggest that these extreme conditions led to the depopulation of Europe, perhaps lasting for several successive glacial-interglacial cycles.

Building doors are card operated, so latecomers may not be able to access the venue.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Wed 24 Apr 17:30: Natural and forced behaviour of the Pacific Walker Circulation over the past 800 years Building doors are card operated, so latecomers may not be able to access the venue.

Tue, 23/04/2024 - 14:33
Natural and forced behaviour of the Pacific Walker Circulation over the past 800 years

The Pacific Walker Circulation (PWC) is an important part of the global climate system, and affects weather and climate all over the world. However, our observational records of the climate system are too short to characterise the PWC ’s long-term internal variability, as well as how the PWC responds to external forcings such as volcanic eruptions and anthropogenic forcings.

In this seminar I will share a reconstruction of the PWC ’s behaviour over the past 800 years. I will outline how I calculated this reconstruction using a network of globally-distributed water isotope proxy records, as well as how I quantified uncertainties from different sources. I will share some new insights this reconstruction has allowed, including a close examination of the PWC ’s response to both volcanic and anthropogenic forcing.

Building doors are card operated, so latecomers may not be able to access the venue.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Wed 05 Jun 17:30: Extreme glacial implies discontinuity of early human occupation of Europe Building doors are card operated, so latecomers may not be able to access the venue.

Mon, 22/04/2024 - 19:00
Extreme glacial implies discontinuity of early human occupation of Europe

The oldest known hominin remains in Europe [ca. 1.5 to 1.1 million years ago (Ma)] have been recovered from Iberia, where paleoenvironmental reconstructions have indicated warm and wet interglacials and mild glacials, supporting the view that once established, hominin populations persisted continuously. We report analyses of marine and terrestrial proxies from a deep-sea core on the Portugese margin that show the presence of pronounced millennial-scale climate variability during a glacial period ca. 1.154 to 1.123 Ma, culminating in a terminal stadial cooling comparable to the most extreme events of the last 400,000 years. Climate envelope–model simulations reveal a drastic decrease in early hominin habitat suitability around the Mediterranean during the terminal stadial. We suggest that these extreme conditions led to the depopulation of Europe, perhaps lasting for several successive glacial-interglacial cycles.

Building doors are card operated, so latecomers may not be able to access the venue.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Wed 05 Jun 17:30: Extreme glacial implies discontinuity of early human occupation of Europe Building doors are card operated, so latecomers may not be able to access the venue.

Mon, 22/04/2024 - 18:33
Extreme glacial implies discontinuity of early human occupation of Europe

The oldest known hominin remains in Europe [1.5 to 1.1 million years ago (Ma)] have been recovered from Iberia, where paleoenvironmental reconstructions have indicated warm and wet interglacials and mild glacials, supporting the view that once established, hominin populations persisted continuously. We report analyses of marine and terrestrial proxies from a deep-sea core on the Portugese margin that show the presence of pronounced millennial-scale climate variability during a glacial period 1.154 to 1.123 Ma, culminating in a terminal stadial cooling comparable to the most extreme events of the last 400,000 years. Climate envelope–model simulations reveal a drastic decrease in early hominin habitat suitability around the Mediterranean during the terminal stadial. We suggest that these extreme conditions led to the depopulation of Europe, perhaps lasting for several successive glacial-interglacial cycles.

Building doors are card operated, so latecomers may not be able to access the venue.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list